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This Quilt Assembly Pattern designed by DEBRA L. ROBERTS OF THE QUILTED MOOSE is not only wonderful and beautiful, we can be sure that it will make a great addition to your collection of PDF’s for pattern making. Better than saving it is making it. Stop and think for a few minutes what colors you can use in this pattern?! THEY ARE ENDLESS. Be assured that it is a pattern that will be passed on from generation to generation and the colors will never be repeated (unless you want them to be). But do you know what a Quilt Assembly is?

Quilt Assembly Pattern

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Quilt Assembly Pattern
Quilt Assembly Pattern by DEBRA L. ROBERTS 

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Quilt Assembly is the process to prepare your quilt top for basting and quilting. Quilt Assembly is layering the quilt backing, batting and quilt top into a quilt sandwich and basting with one of the basting methods available. The method of quilting may influence the way you assemble you prepare your “quilt sandwich”.

For all methods of Quilt Assembly, having a quilt top that’s free of loose threads, well pressed, flat and square is important. Quilt backing should also be pressed, and extend 3-4 inches beyond the quilt in all directions, but different methods will require more or less backing.

As with quilt backing, batting will also extend beyond the quilt top by the amount required for the finishing techniques. If you are having your quilt professionally finished by a long arm quilter, they will instruct you on how to prepare your quilt and backing. Some long arm quilters will layer.

Benefits of Quilt Assembly

Proper Quilt Assembly makes quilting by hand or machine easier. Nesting seams and pressing seams flat will help to eliminate bumps where the seams join. Tools and Supplies  for Quilt Assembly. You’ll need the following for Quilt Assembly:

  • Quilt Top
  • Batting
  • Backing

Once each of your blocks have been quilt assembled (or appliquéd), it is time to sew the whole quilt top together.

Quilt Assembly  or Quilt blocks are generally bound together by sashing. Alternatively they can be bound without sashing, however the sashing offers a boarder around the block and also a chance to relax the eye by offering it something simpler and less confusing. This way you are able to focus on the intricacy of each block with out them blurring together.

After you have cut each piece of sashing, simply attach it to the blocks in a similar manner to the way the squares were assembled. It is often easier to create long strips and then sew the strips together.

Be very careful when pinning the long strips together as by this stage there are literally hundreds of seams and all it takes is for a couple of them to be 1 mm off and you are out by a 1/4 inch!

When pinning try to use the right angles of the fabric to line up the seam, that way the quilt will be in perfect geometric order. See more patterns here in criativepatterns.com

When joining rows make sure matching seam allowances are pressed in opposite directions to prevent that area looking bulky. Remember to always press towards the darker fabrics so that you can’t see the seam allowance through the lighter material.

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